Skip to content

Rosh Hashanah-Yom Kippur

September 9, 2009

Two important events occur for the Hebrew people this month. On the evening of September 18 Rosh Hashanah begins and ten days later Yom Kippur or the Day of Atonement.

Rosh Hashanah occurs on the first and second days of Tishri. In Hebrew, it means, literally, “head of the year” or “first of the year.” It is commonly known as the Jewish New Year.

The name “Rosh Hashanah” is not used in the Bible to discuss this holiday. The Bible refers to the holiday as Yom Ha-Zikkaron (the day of remembrance) or Yom Teruah (the day of the sounding of the shofar). The holiday is instituted in Leviticus 23:24-25.

The ten days starting with Rosh Hashanah and ending with Yom Kippur are commonly known as the Days of Awe (Yamim Noraim) or the Days of Repentance. For the Jews this is a time for serious introspection, a time to consider the sins of the previous year and repent before Yom Kippur.

Yom Kippur is probably the most important holiday of the Jewish year. Many Jews who do not observe any other Jewish custom will refrain from work, fast and/or attend synagogue services on this day. Yom Kippur occurs on the 10th day of Tishri. The holiday is instituted at Leviticus 23:26.

For Christians it is important to remember that the Hebrew people continue to follow their traditions. We can learn more about their practices in order to share the good news of Jesus Christ’s atonement for the sins of the whole world.

Since the temple was destroyed in 70AD there is no place for Jews to offer the required blood sacrifices for sins. They believe that God will forgive the repentant sinner. Christians also believe in repentance and God’s forgiveness. However, the forgiveness is based upon the acceptance of the all sufficient sacrifice of Jesus Christ.

If you would like to learn about modern Judaism go to Judaism 101 at the following address: http://www.jewfaq.org/index.htm ; it is the best one that I know of. It will give you a desire to share Christ with your Jewish friend.

Advertisements
No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: